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BIBLICAL DOGMATICS

Milton S. Terry, D.D.
Professor of Christian Doctrine in Garrett Biblical Institute
ã1907 By, Eaton & Mains.

——  WORKS OF  ——

Milton S. Terry, D.D., LL.D.

  • BIBLICAL HERMENEUTICS. A Treatise on the Interpretation of the Old and New Testaments.
  • BIBLICAL APOCALYPTICS. A Study of the Most Notable Revelations of God and of Christ in the Canonical Scriptures.
  • BIBLICAL DOGMATICS. An Exposition of the Prin­cipal Doctrines of the Holy Scriptures.
  • PRIMER OF CHRISTIAN DOCTRINE. In the Form of Questions and Answers.
  • THE NEW APOLOGETIC. Five Lectures on True and False Methods of Meeting Modern Philosophical and Critical Attacks upon the Christian Religion.
  • MOSES AND THE PROPHETS. An Essay Toward a Fair and Useful Statement of Some of the Positions of Modern Biblical Criticism.
  • THE NEW AND LIVING WAY. An Orderly Arrange­ment and Exposition of the Doctrines of Christian Experience, according to ti‑te Scriptures.
  • THE MEDIATION OF JESUS CHRIST. A Contribu­tion to the Study of Biblical Dogmatics.
  • THE PROPHECIES OF DANIEL EXPOUNDED.
  • THE SIBYLLINE ORACLES. Translated from the Greek into English Blank Verse, with Notes. New edition, revised according to the Text of Rzach.
  • COMMENTARY ON GENESIS AND EXODUS. (Whedon Series on the Old Testament, Vol. 1.)
  • COMMENTARY ON JUDGES, RUTH, FIRST AND SECOND SAMUL, L. (Whedon Series, Vol. III.).
  • COMMENTARY ON RINGS, CHRONICLES, EZRA, NEHEMIAH, AND ESTHER. (Whedon Series, Vol. IV.).

 

BIBLICAL DOGMATICS
AN EXPOSITION
OF THE
PRINCIPAL DOCTRINES
OF THE
HOLY SCRIPTURES

BY
MILTON S. TERRY, D.D.
Professor of Christian Doctrine Garrett Biblical Institute
NEW YORK: EATON & MAINS
CINCINNATI: JENNINGS & GRAHAM
©1907

——  PREFACE  ——

    So long as men continue to think there will be no end of books on a subject so important as the doctrines of the Christian faith. The living truths of God can never be fully expounded. The Scriptures of the Old and New Testaments are a source of religious teaching so inexhaustible that each new generation of biblical scholars discovers therein treasures of knowledge unnoticed by previous research. Other departments of study are also continually furnishing new contributions to the sum of human knowledge and throwing their suggestive side-lights on many portions of the Bible, so that we are not infrequently called upon to revise some of our former opinions and adjust them to the newly discovered facts. No old and permanent truth can ever suffer loss by the incoming of new light, but the weakness and unprofitableness of aged errors become thereby apparent. If the Bible is permit­ted to speak for itself, and its divers portions are studied in their proper historical connections and in the light of the contemporaneous religious literature of ancient peoples, it will be found to be a remarkable self-interpreting book, and to disclose a real progress in the knowledge of God among the Hebrew prophets and teach­ers. It is with no assumption of having discovered any remarkably new truths that we put forth this volume, but rather with a conviction that, amid the fresh and increasing light coming from many sources, the old abiding truths may be set forth in a some­what new and more helpful manner. We are persuaded that the best method of expounding the great truths of the Christian reli­gion is that which most accurately reproduces the teachings of the biblical writers and formulates them in the fullest light of the gospel of Jesus. This volume is, such an attempt at a new expression of the things which are most commonly believed among us. No new or strange doctrines are here exploited; no old and well-attested truth is set aside; but certain doctrines of the Chris­tian faith are here presented in a manner somewhat different from that which has long been prevalent. In no such case, how­ever, has any fundamental truth been questioned; the only issue is one of interpretation, and on most questions of interpretation there is room for differences of opinion.

    The days of theological controversy are happily well nigh past. There is manifest a growing disposition to subject all questions of doubtful disputation to rational criticism. It is generally con­ceded that many subjects, which involve biblical exegesis and doctrine, call for revision and restatement. In a volume of this scope and size one cannot reasonably expect all his readers to agree with him throughout. The author indulges no presumption of clearing up the “things hard to be understood” in Paul’s epistles, of which the writer of 2nd Pet. 3:16, speaks; much less can he hope to explain all the mysteries of the other apostles, and the evangelists and the prophets. In offering the result of his own study of questions long under investigation and dispute in the Church, he takes pains to tell his readers in advance that some of the exposi­tions of doctrine given in this book are submitted tentatively and with no little hesitation. On sundry questions of eschatology who can at the most do more than “see in a mirror, darkly”? There is a widespread feeling that the real teaching of our Lord and hi apostles does not sustain many current popular notions of “times and seasons which the Father has set within his own authority.” There are abroad in the world many strange and crass conceptions of the coming of Christ, the resurrection of the dead and the eternal judgment. On such topics as these which transcend the actual experiences of mankind and pertain to the invisible things of God, one should speak with modesty and reserve. Among the mysteries over which great and good men have differed in opinion through many generations there may generally be found a sub­ stance of truth of permanent value. It is coming to be recognized that even the biblical writers themselves differ in types of doctrine and in cast of thought, and it is very possible for interpreters of the apostles and prophets to misapprehend the exact import of their various figures of speech. It is possible for the most discreet students of Holy Writ sometimes to teach for revelations of God what are only the mistaken notions of men. There are probably but few men who have not inherited from the past a larger amount of human tradition and dogma than they are aware of.

    We have long hesitated over employing the title of Dogmatics for a treatise which aims to avoid the dogmatic spirit and style so deservedly unpopular and offensive in the Christian world. It is proper, therefore, to observe that this word has no full or fair equivalent in the English language. In the literature of Christian theology it has long served as the definite scientific term for a systematic exposition of religious truth. Its conformity, more­over, to the scientific titles of the two companion volumes of this series is a special justification of our use of it. Our method is inductive and expository. Our habit is to abstain from a priori assumptions and to avoid unprofitable speculation, but always to study to ascertain the demonstrable truth of the biblical teaching. We keep in mind the fact of a progress in divine revelation, and therefore do not forget that the spirit and the ideas of the Old Testament have been largely superseded by the more perfect illumination of the teaching of Christ, who has fulfilled the law and the prophets. It will be seen that the method of this treatise is first to study the nature of man, his sinfulness and the possibilities of his future, as matters of observation and of biblical testimony. We next pass to the great central fact of the religious history of the world, the manifestation of Jesus Christ. This subject, by reason of its vital relation to all Christian thought, naturally occupies the central and largest place in our volume. The doctrine of the God and Father of our Lord Jesus Christ follows as the Holy of holies among religious mysteries. Our method of treating this deepest problem of religion is historical rather than polemical, and aims to show how the everlasting Father has gradually revealed himself, in many ways unto all men, but most remarkably through the fathers and prophets of Israel, and finally through his Son Jesus Christ. This method of procedure is quite the opposite of what is commonly followed in systems of theology. It studies visible man first and the invisible God last. It gives no space, except in occasional footnotes, to the old-time polemics. It ignores “plans” and “schemes” and “theories” of atonement. Even the doctrine of the Trinity finds but little more attention in this volume than it finds in the Scriptures. Our method provides no separate section for “eschatology,” but simply connects the problems of the future with those facts of the present time to which they are logically and vitally related. This method, of course, will not please the confessional theologian; it may even much offend him. But we believe the great majority of unbiased readers will find it a more simple and excellent way. If it be not the best possible method, it may at least be worth one trial. If any one prefer, he can read our third part first, and our first part last. We assume from the start that our readers are intelligent Christian believers, and can study man’s nature and destiny without having first to be informed of the facts of Christ and the existence of God. We advise our readers to make much use of the carefully prepared indexes at the close of this volume, for different phases of the same subject are often treated in different connections, and numerous biblical texts contain doctrines related to several different topics.

    In the main text of this volume we have rarely made a citation from any other source than the Scriptures. In occasional foot­notes may be found some quotations and references adapted to confirm our views, or to direct the reader to a further study of the same topic. Hundreds of such references, however, at first designed for insertion in footnotes, have been omitted entirely, in order to keep the volume within a moderate size. A select bibliography is given as an appendix, sufficient to direct the special student in his further research. Without the help of the many contributions of the past, the present treatise could not have been written. The author also owes it to his esteemed colleagues, Professor C. M. Stuart, Professor D. A. Hayes, and Professor F. C. Eiselen, to make this public acknowledgement of their invaluable services by way of many helpful suggestions and in the reading of the proofs.

    With this publication we complete the trilogy of our contribu­tions to the study of biblical interpretation and doctrine which we began with the issue of Biblical Hermeneuties in 1883. The Biblical Apocalypties followed in 1898. The numerous gratify­ing testimonials of welcome which the preceding volumes have received are deeply appreciated, and the hope is indulged that this concluding volume may be found as acceptable as its predecessors.

    EVANSTON, FEBRUARY 22, 1907.

 

CONTENTS

———

GENERAL OUTLINE

INTRODUCTION

Part Second

  1. Idea and Scope of Biblical Dogmatics
  2. Source of Biblical Dogmatics
  3. Method of Biblical Dogmatics

———

Part First

THE CONSTITUTION AND
POSSIBILITIES OF MAN

  1. THE NATURE OF MAN
  2. THE SINFULNESS OF MAN
  3. THE REGENERATION AND ETERNAL LIFE OF MAN

THE MANIFESTATION
OF CHRIST

  1. THE PERSON OF CHRIST

  2. THE MEDIATION OF JESUS CHRIST

  3. THE KINGDOM AND COMING OF CHRIST

Part Third

OUR FATHER IN HEAVEN

  1. THE UNIVERSAL REVELATION

  2. THE HEBREW REVELATION

  3. THE REVELATION IN JESUS CHRIST

ANALYTICAL OUTLINE

———

INTRODUCTION

CHAPTER 1
Idea and Scope of Biblical Dogmatics

  1. Theology and Religion
  2. Universality of Religion and Revelation
  3. Philosophy of Religion,
  4. The Christian Religion
  5. Biblical Theology
  6. Systematic Theology
  7. Limits and Aim of Biblical Dogmatics
  8. Theology Old and New,.

CHAPTER 2
Sources of Biblical Dogmatics

  1. The Bible a Priceless Treasury
  2. Trarnmels of Old Tradition
  3. Reaction and Changes of View
  4. Other Sacred Bibles
  5. Limits of the Biblical Canon
  6. Other Traditions Questioned
  7. Variety of Compositions
  8. Three Divisions of the Hebrew Canon
  9. The New Testament Canon
  10. Superiority of the New Testament

(1) Shown by Statements of Jesus
(2) Shown by other New Testament TeachIng
(3) Shown by Obvious Facts of the Records
(4) The Transition Gradual.

  1. The Question of Inspiration

(1) Highest Old Testament Claims
(2) Witness of the New Testament

(3) Such Claims not Applicable to All the Books
(4) Our Doctrine should Accord with existIng Facts
(5) Inerrancy a Dogma of Necessitarian Philosophy

  1. The Dogma of Infallibility

(1) Involves a Distorted Notion of the Bible
(2) Discredited by Discrepancies and Persistent Controversy
(3) The Word Itself Irrelevant
(4) Sufficiency Rather than Infallibility

  1. Authority as Sources of Doctrine

(1) Superiority In Variety of Contents
(2) Superiority of Historic Outline and Background
(3) Superiority of the Revelation of Christ

  1. The Bible and the Word of God
  2. Necessity of Sound Interpretation
  3. Sufficiency as Sources Of Doctrine

CHAPTER 3
Method of Biblical Dogmatics

  1. Importance of Method
  2. Lack of System in Ancient Writers
  3. Federal and Trinitarian Methods
  4. Methods of some German Writers
  5. Methods of Five American Divines
  6. Outlines of Other Writers
  7. Questions of Scope and Terminology
  8. A Priori and a Posteriori Methods
  9. The Method of this Work,

PART FIRST

THE CONSTITUTION AND POSSIBILITIES OF MAN

SECTION FIRST
THE NATURE OF MAN

CHAPTER 1
The Natural Constitution or Man

  1. Primary Realities
  2. The Bodily Form
  3. Life, Soul and Blood
  4. The Heart
  5. Reins, Intestines, Breath
  6. The Head
  7. The Mind
  8. The Spirit
  9. The Doctrine of Trichotomy

    (1) Has no Support in Sound interpretation
    (2) The Words Used Indiscriminately
    (3) Yet with Distinctive Connotation
     

  10. General Result

CHAPTER 2
The Moral Element In Man

  1. The Fact of Moral Sense
  2. Conscience

(1) Old Testament Illustration
(2) New Testament use of suneidhsiv
(3) Essential Moral Sense

  1. Personality and Freedom of Will
  2. The Moral Element of Social Relations

CHAPTER 3
The Religious Element In Man

  1. Essential in Normal Human Nature
  2. Biblical Words Expressive of Religious Feeling and Action
  3. Earliest Manifestations of the Religious Sense
  4. Has due Recognition in Scripture
  5. Was Gradually Developed
  6. Universal in Mankind

CHAPTER 4
Propagation and Dispersion of Mankind

  1. Unity of the Human Race

  2. Propagation of Species

  3. Creationism and its Proof-texts

  4. Dispersion of Races and Tribes

CHAPTER 5
The Origin of Man

  1. The Definite Modern Question
  2. Two Ways of Answering the Question
  3. Poetical Concepts of Creation
  4. No Definite Answer in Scripture
  5. But Man is the Crowning Work of God

           

           

CHAPTER 6
Man's Place In the World

  1. Man as the Chief Creation of God
  2. Ancient Concepts of "the Heavens and the Earth,"
  3. Not Physical Bulk but Rational Nature Man's crowning Excellence

CHAPTER 7
Primitive State of Man

  1. Completeness of Natural Constitution
  2. Undeveloped in Knowledge and Civilization
  3. Original Goodness
  4. Made in the Image of God

(1) No Explanation in Scripture
(2) New Testament Texts In Ephesians 4:24; Col. 3:9, 10
(3) Interpretation of Wisdom 2:23
(4) Spiritual Personality.

SECTION SECOND
THE SINFULNESS OF MAN

CHAPTER 1
The Fact and the Nature of Human Sinfulness

  1. The Awful Fact of Sin
  2. Depravity of the Race

(1) Depleted in Genesis
(2) Paul's dark Picture In Romans 1:18-32
(3) Great Antithesis in Romans 5:12-19

  1. Hebrew and Greek Words Indicating Nature of Sin
  2. Sin Conceived as Transgression and Lawlessness
  3. Sin Conceived as Selfishness
  4. Concept of Spiritual Blindness
  5. Concept of Guilt

(1) The Fact Explained
(2) significance of aitia
(3) Significance of enocov
(4) Guilt even in Errors of Ignorance

  1. Degrees of Guilt and Sin

(1) Hardening the Heart
(2) Blasphemy against the Holy Spirit
(3) Doctrine of Hebrews 6:4-8 and 10:26, 27
(4) Other Biblical Testimony

CHAPTER 2
The Origin and the Persistent Cause of Sin

  1. Adequate Cause Must be Sought
  2. Inadequate Theories
  3. Adequate and Actual Cause in Man's Personality
  4. Illustrated in Genesis 3
  5. Same Efficient Cause Apparent in all Sinning
  6. Nature of Volitional Freedom
  7. Other Resultant Facts of Sin
  8. Biblical Records of Apostasy

(1) Israel's Apostasy in the Desert
(2) Examples of Saul, David, Solomon
(3) New Testament Admonition and Warning


SECTION SECOND
THE SINFULNESS OF MAN

CHAPTER 3
Divers Aspects of Sin In the Various Biblical Writers

  1. Defective Moral Standards of Old Te.9tament Times

  2. Imprecatory Psalms

  3. Public and National Sins Overshadow the Individual

  4. Divorcing Morality and Public Service

  5. Collective Idea of Sin and Penalty

  6. Deeper Concepts of Psalms and Prophets

  7. Individual Responsibility in Ezekiel and Jeremiah

  8. Sin as Represented in the Wisdom Books

(1) In Proverbs
(2) In the Book of Job
(3) In the Song of Songs
(4) In Ecclesiastes
(5) In the Later Jewish Literature

  1. Paul's Doctrine of Sin in the Flesh

  2. Pauline Rabbinism

CHAPTER 4
The Penal Consequences of Sin

  1. Physical Death as Penalty

  2. Physical Death as Universal Law

  3. Physical Evils not a Penalty for Sin

  4. New Testament Doctrine of Death

  5. Pauline Conception of Sin and Death

  6. Penal Consequences beyond this Life

  7. Biblical Doctrine of Retribution

(1) Old Testament Teaching Vague
(2) Isaiah 66:24
(3) Daniel 12:2
(4) Apocrypha and Pseudepigrapha
(5) The New Testament Teaching

  1. Inferences Touching the Nature of Future Punishment

  2. Sheol, Hades, Gehenna, Tartarus

  3. Degrees of Penalty

  4. Duration of Penalty Everlasting

(1) Absence of Hope or Promise
(2) Question of Matthew 12:32
(3) Question of 1 Peter 3:18-20

  1. Doctrine of Annihilation of the Wicked

  2. The Question of Theodicy

 

 

 

 

SECTION THIRD
THE REGENERATION AND
ETERNAL LIFE OF MAN

CHAPTER 1
Conviction, Repentance, and Conversion

  1. Salvation a Fact of Experience

  2. Blameless Childhood and Youth

  3. Conviction of Sin

(1) Expressed In the Penitential Psalms
(2) Described in Romans 7
(3) Experienced by Millions

  1. Repentance

  2. Conversion

  3. Requires Cooperation of God and Man

CHAPTER 2

The Doctrine of Faith

  1. Faith Defined

  2. Doctrine of Paul

  3. Theme of the Epistle to the Romans

  4. Example of Abraham in Romans 4

  5. Doctrine of James

  6. Doctrine of the Epistle to the Hebrews

  7. Doctrine of Faith in the Gospels

  8. Personal Confession

CHAPTER 3
Forgiveness of Sins and Reconciliation

  1. Greek Words for Remission

  2. Peculiarity of Paul's Doctrine of Justification

  3. Reconciliation

CHAPTER 4
New Birth and New Life

  1. Comprehensive of the Other Experiences

  2. Idea of a New Heart in the Old Testament

  3. Teaching of Jesus in John 3:3-8

  4. Significance of Titus 3:5, and Ephesians 5:26

  5. The New Birth a New Creation

  6. Mystery of Spiritual Life

  7. A Passing out of Death into Life

CHAPTER 5
Adoption, Sonship, Assurance, and Spiritual Freedom

  1. New Relationship of Adoption

  2. Sons of God

  3. Witness of the Spirit

  4. Boldness, Confidence, and Full Assurance

  5. Christian Freedom


CHAPTER 6
Progress in Spiritual Life

  1. New Life Involves Growth
  2. Elements of Spiritual Growth
  3. Argument of Romans 6
  4. Doctrine of 1 John 3:9, 10
  5. Sanctification and Holiness
  6. Practical Righteousness
  7. Doctrine of Christian Perfection
  8. Specific Christian Virtues
  9. Love the Greatest of All
  10. Continual Cultivation and Growth
  11. The Discipline of Trial
  12. Growth and Discipline a Manifold Experience
  13. The Beautiful in Religion

CHAPTER 7
Means of Promoting Spiritual Life

  1. The Fellowship and Ministries of the Church
  2. The Sacraments

(1) Christian Baptism|
(2) The Lord's Supper

  1. The Ministry of the Word
  2. Exercises of Practical Godliness
  3. Prayer
  4. Sevenfold Exhortation of Hebrews 10:19-25

CHAPTER 8
Eternal Life

  1. Meaning of the Phrase
  2. Paul's View of Life, Light, and Liberty
  3. Eternal Life a Present Possession
  4. Endless Permanence in Life
  5. Eternal Life in the Synoptic Gospels
  6. Eternal Life in the Epistles
  7. A Glorious Inheritance, Now and Forever

CHAPTER 9
The Doctrine of Immortality

  1. The Fact and the Doctrine
  2. Human Limitation and Doubt
  3. Doctrine of the Old Testament

(1) Sundry Intimations
(2) Expressed In many Psalms
(3) Job 19:25-27
(4) The Realm of Sheol
(5) The Greek Word Hades

  1. Doctrine of the New Testament

(1) In the Apocalypse of John
(2) In the Epistle to the Hebrews
(3) In the Epistles of Paul
(4) Teaching of Jesus in the Syi3opties
(5) Teaching of Jesus in John's Gospel.

CHAPTER 10
The Doctrine of the Resurrection

  1. A Doctrine Variously Apprehended
  2. Vaguely Expressed in Old Testament

(1) Psalm 17:15
(2) Language of Other Poets and Prophets
(3) Hosea 6:1-3
(4) Isaiah 26:19
(5) Ezekiel 37:1-14
(6) Daniel 12:2, 3
(7) Variety of Later Jewish Opinions

  1. The Fuller Teaching in the New Testament
  2. No Help from Etymology of Greek Words
  3. The Teaching of Jesus Christ

  (1) Significance of Christ's own Resurrection
  (2) Significance of the Ascension
  (3) Rationale of the Forty Days
  (4) Forty Days In the Flesh
  (5) Not Glorified During the Forty Days
  (6) Glorified at the Ascension
  (7) Jesus' Raising Others from the Dead
  (8) Jesus' Teaching In the Synoptic Gospels
  (9) Jesus' Teaching In John's Gospel
(10) Jesus Absolutely Assures Immortality,
       but Offers no Theories

  1. Doctrine of the Apocalypse of John
  2. Paul's Doctrine of the Resurrection

(1) Acts 24:15
(2) 1 Thessalonians 4:13-18
(3) 1 Corinthians 15 (The Six Paragraphs)
(4) 2 Corinthians 4:16 - 5:10
(5) In Romans and Philippians
(6) In Colossians, Ephesians, and 2 Timothy

  1. Various Types of Biblical Doctrine
  2. No Basis for Many Prevalent Theories
  3. The Main Idea is a New Organism
  4. All the Dead not Raised Simultaneously
  5. The Subject Belongs to the Unseen
  6. Summary of the Biblical Teaching

CHAPTER 11
Various Aspects of the Heavenly Glory

  1. The General Conception
  2. Heavenly Recognition

(1) Doctrines of Absorption and of Transmigration
(2) The Biblical Suggestions

  1. Absence of all Evil
  2. A Sabbath Rest
  3. Advance in Knowledge and in Heavenly Vision
  4. Increase of Capacity
  5. Reigning with Christ
  6. Glory Through Ages of Ages

 

 

PART SECOND

THE MANIFESTATION OF THE CHRIST

SECTION FIRST
THE PERSON OF CHRIST

CHAPTER 1
Facts or His Earthly Life

  1. Born of the House of David

  2. Record of the Virgin Birth

  3. Childhood and Growth

  4. His Baptism and Temptation

  5. His Public Ministry and Death

  6. A Man Among Men

  7. A Man of Transcendent Greatness

  8. Manner and Matter of His Teaching

  9. His Marvelous Self-Expression

  10. His Sinlessness

CHAPTER 2
The Titles Son of God and Son of Man

  1. The Title Son of God

(1) Old Testament Origin and Messianic Significance
(2) His Knowledge of the Father
(3) The Only Begotten Son

  1. The Title Son of Man

(1) Its Usage In the Old Testament
(2) "Son of Man" In the Book of Enoch
(3) The Lord's own Favorite Title
(4) A Person Sublimely Unique.

CHAPTER 3
The Supernatural in the Person of Christ

  1. The Supernatural Birth

  2. The Baptism, Temptation, and Triumph

  3. The Miracles of his Ministry

  4. Miracles Natural with Christ

  5. No Ostentatious Display of Miracles

  6. Miracles Proofs of Divine Wisdom and Power, but not of Omnipotence

  7. The Resurrection and Ascension

CHAPTER 4
The Self-Consciousness of Jesus Christ

  1. The Mighty Works and Mighty Words of Jesus Inseparable

  2. His Consciousness of God

  3. His Sense of Subordination

  4. Consciousness of Commitment to a Purpose of the Ages

  5. Consciousness of Pre-existence

  6. Conscious Freedom from Sin

  7. Consciousness of Being Saviour of Men

  8. Consciousness of his Messiahship

 

 

(1) Assumed in his Fulfilling Law and Prophets
(2) Directly Acknowledged
(3) Indicated in his Doctrine of the Kingdom

  1. Significance of this Consciousness

CHAPTER 5
Christology of the First Apostles and of
the General Epistle
.

  1. Sources of Information

  2. The Preaching of Peter

  3. The First Epistle of Peter

  4. Second Peter and Jude

  5. The Epistle of James

CHAPTER 6
The Christ of John's Apocalypse

  1. Date and Composition of the Book

  2. The Christophany of  1:12-16

  3. The Lamb in the Midst of the Throne

  4.  His Titles, Glory, Triumphs, and Worship

  5. The Grand Total Impression of the Revelation

CHAPTER 7
The Pauline Christology

  1. Significance of Paul's Conversion

  2. The Thessalonian Epistles

  3. The Corinthian Epistles

  4. The Epistle to the Galatians

  5. The Epistle to the Romans

  6. The Epistle to Philemon

  7. The Pastoral Epistles

  8. The Ephesian Epistle

  9. The Epistle to the Philippians

  10. The Epistle to the Colossians

(1) Fullness of the Deity
(2) significance of 1:13-18
(3) Firstborn of all Creation
(4) HIS Pre-eminence

  1. The Pauline Doctrine of Pre-existence

(1) The Phrase "sent forth from God"
(2) Christ the Spiritual Rock
(3 ) 1 Corinthians 15:45-49
(4) 2 Corinthians 8:9

  1. Pauline Texts which call Christ God

(1) 1 Timothy 3:16
(2) Titus 2:13
(3) Romans 9:5
(4) Ephesians 5:5
(5) Acts 20:28


CHAPTER 8
Christology of the Epistle to the Hebrews

  1. Character and Scope of the Epistle
  2. The Facts of the Incarnation
  3. Various Designations of Christ
  4. Doctrine of Pre-existence
  5. Effulgence of Glory and Image of Substance
  6. Question of Divine Titles Applied

CHAPTER 9
The Johannine Christology

  1. The Johannine Peculiarities
  2. The Word, or Logos
  3. The Logos in Greek Philosophy and in Philo
  4. Personification of Wisdom in Jewish Writings
  5. Creation by the Word of God
  6. Theophanies and Angelophanies
  7. John's Gospel Gave the Logos New and Deeper Significance
  8. Necessity of Incarnation
  9. Suggestive Words and Phrases
  10. The Word of Life
  11. The Word of Light
  12. Doctrine of Pre-existence
  13. The-Idealistic Explanation

(1) Does Not Accord with John's Explicit Language
(2) Logos Not Synonymous with Abstract Terms
(3) More than Memra, Shekina or Angel

  1. John's Doctrine Far above the Current Theosophy
  2. Erroneous Metaphysical Distinctions
  3. Jesus Christ in the Flesh

CHAPTER 10
Summary of the New Testament Doctrine
of the Person of Jesus Christ

  1. The Divers Dogmas of Historical Theology
  2. Divers Types of the Biblical Doctrine
  3. Onesidedness of Polemics
  4. The Simplest Facts of His Life
  5. His Subordinate Relation to God
  6. His Consciousness of Unique Relationship to God
  7. His Heavenly Pre-existence
  8. Self-Coherence of the Supernatural in Christ
  9. A Likeness of Method in Paul and John
  10. The Godhead of Christ Jesus
  11. The Mystery of God

 

 

 

SECTION SECOND
THE MEDIATION OF JESUS CHRIST

CHAPTER 1
The Mystery of Mediation and of Incarnation

  1. Nature of Mediation
  2. Doctrine and Ideals of Incarnation
  3. Mystery and Purpose of the Ages

CHAPTER 2
Old Testament Ideas of Mediation

  1. Value of Old Testament Ideas
  2. Primitive Priesthood and Mediation
  3. Moses and Samuel as Mediators
  4. The Levitical Priesthood
  5. The Sacrificial Offerings

(1) Cereal Offerings
(2) Blood Offerings
(3) The Sin Offering

  1. The Goat for Azazel
  2. Symbolical Significance of Blood
  3. The Consuming of the Flesh
  4. Significance of and its Derivatives
  5. Frequent Biblical Allusion to Sacrifices
  6. Human Sacrifices
  7. Priesthood and Sacrifice Express Deep Religious Convictions
  8. Insufficiency of Animal Sacrifices
  9. Ideas of Mediation in the Prophets
  10. The Suffering Servant of Jehovah in Isaiah 53

(1) The Preceding Context
(2) The Contrasts
(3) Mediatorial Soul-Passion
(4) Triumph and Exaltation
(5) The Christian Interpretation

  1. Idea given in Daniel 9:24
  2. Doctrine of the Penitential Psalms
  3. Connection with Israel's Messianic Hope

CHAPTER 3
Sayings or Jesus relative to Redemption

  1. Comparatively Little on this Subject in the Gospels
  2. His Entire Life a Ransom for Many
  3. Words of Jesus at the Last Supper
  4. God's Great Love for the World
  5. Giving his Flesh and Blood for the World
  6. Dying for Others
  7. Intercessory Prayer in Chapter 17
  8. Words of Jesus on the Cross

CHAPTER 4
Doctrine of John and or Peter

  1. Doctrine of the First Epistle of John
  2. Old Testament Imagery of Blood Offerings
  3. The Living Paraclete
  4. The Coming through Water and Blood
  5. Testimony of the Spirit
  6. Doctrine of John's Apocalypse
  7. The Teaching of Peter
  8. Sprinkling of the Blood of Jesus
  9. Bearing our Sins in his Body
  10. Partaking in Christ's Sufferings

CHAPTER 5
Doctrine of the Pauline Epistles

  1. Christ's Mediation the Substance of Paul's Gospel
  2. The Corinthian Epistles
  3. God in Christ Reconciling the World
  4. Epistle to the Galatians
  5. Becoming a Curse for Us
  6. Epistle to the Romans
  7. Discussion of Romans 3:21-26

(1) Not a New Teaching
(2) Originates with God
(3) Passing over Former Sins
(4) Two Greek Words
(5) Realized through Faith
(6) Magnifies the Law
(7) Mysterious Necessities of the Moral World

  1. Continuous Reconciliation, Romans 4:25
  2. The Great Antithesis of Romans 5:12-21
  3. The Doctrine in Ephesians and Colossians
  4. In the Pastoral Epistles

CHAPTER 6
Doctrine of the Epistle to the Hebrews

  1. Outline of the Epistle
  2. Superior Priesthood of Jesus
  3. Symbolism of the Tabernacle
  4. Mediator of the New Covenant, Hebrews 9:15-18

(1) Reasons for "Testament" In Hebrews 9:16, 17
(2) Reasons for "Covenant"

  1. This Not a Covenant between Equals
  2. Alexandrian Cast of the Epistle
  3. Substantial Agreement of All the New Testament Writers

CHAPTER 7
Summary of the Biblical Doctrine

  1. A Continuous Process, not a Finished Work
  2. Largely Set Forth by Symbols and Metaphors
  3. Use of Current Forms of Speech
  4. Necessity of Christ's Mediation

(1) Necessity in man
(2) Necessity In Nature of God

  1. Such Suffering not Penal
  2. Does Not Remove All Consequences of Sin
  3. Tot an Objective Process or Ground of God's Activity
  4. Essentially Spiritual in its Operation
  5. Effectual Through a Living Faith
  6. No Theory of Atonement in the Scriptures
  7. Mystical Body of Christ
  8. The Communion of Saints

SECTION THIRD
THE KINGDOM AND COMING OF CHRIST

CHAPTER 1
The Nature of the Kingdom of Christ

  1. Heavenly Enthronement of Jesus Christ

  2. Old Testament Doctrine of the Kingdom of God

(1) God Rules In Many and Divers Forms
(2) God as the Supreme Judge
(3) Apocalyptic Day of Jehovah
(4) Messianic Prophecies Of the Kingdom
(5) The Messiah an Associate with the Most High

  1. Views of the Kingdom Current among the Jews

  2. The Doctrine of Jesus

(1) A Kingdom of Heaven
(2) Lessons of the Parables
(3) A Spiritual Kingdom
(4) The Greatest in the Kingdom
(5) The Fundamental Law of Love
(6) Jesus' Teaching Different from John's Ideal
(7) Jesus' Teaching In John's Gospel

  1. Doctrine of Pauline Epistles

  2. Other New Testament Teaching

  3. Contemplates Present and Future Blessedness

  4. Concluding Summary

 

 

 


CHAPTER 2
The Coming of the Kingdom of Christ.

  1. Variety of Biblical Statements, Words and Phrases
  2. Coming in the Near Future
  3. Jesus' Eschatological Discourse
  4. The End of the Age
  5. Supposed Inconsistencies

(1) Matthew 24:14
(2) The Day and Hour Unknown
(3) Apocalyptic Language

  1. The Words parouia, and ercomai
  2. Admonition of Luke 17:20-37
  3. Synoptic Testimony Quite Decisive
  4. Excludes Literalism
  5. Doctrine of John's Gospel

(1) John 3:3-7; 31-36
(2) John 14:3
(3) John 21:22, 23.

  1. General Apostolic Allusions
  2. Import of the word epifaneia
  3. Import of apokaluyv, and fanerwsiv
  4. The Statement in Acts 1:11
  5. Doctrine of John's Apocalypse

(1) The First Part, 1-11
(2) The Second Part, 12-22
(3) New Jerusalem a Symbol of the Kingdom of Heaven

  1. Biblical Doctrine of Antichrist

(1) Old Testament Concepts
(2) Antichrist In John's Apocalypse

  1. The Pauline Doctrine of Antichrist

(1) Relation of Second Thessalonians 2:1-12, to First Thessalonians 4:13-18
(2) Meaning of Second Thessalonians 2:2
(3) imagery of Paul's Picture of Antichrist
(4) Other Peculiar Words and Phrases
(5) Essential Content and Import of the Pauline Doctrine.

  1. The Antichrist of the Johannine Epistles

  2. General Conclusion.

CHAPTER 3
Continuous Development of the Kingdom of Christ

  1. Christ to Overcome the World

  2. Old Testament Messianic Ideals

(1) Ancient Promises
(2) Psalms 110 and 72
(3) Isaiah 2:2-4
(4) Isaiah 9:1-7, and 11:1-10
(5) Daniel 2:44, and 7:13.

  1. Christ as Ruler and Judge

  2. Days of Judgment

  3. The Judgment in Matthew 25:31-46

  4. Times and Modes of Judgment Not Specifically Revealed

  5. Eternal Issues of the Judgment

  6. Judgment of God and of Christ One

  7. A New Power in the World

  8. Its Period One of Untold Ages and Generations

  9. Regeneration and Restitution of All things

  10. Paul's Statement in First Corinthians 15:24-28

CHAPTER 4
The Mission and Ministry of the Spirit of Christ

  1. Vital Relation of the Kingdom of Christ and the Ministry of His Spirit

  2. The Spirit Operative Before End of Age

  3. Meaning of the Word Spirit

  4. Threefold Elements of Personality

  5. Epithets applied to the Spirit of God

  6. The Spirit Capable of Grief

  7. Advance in the New Testament Doctrine

  8. Christ and the Holy Spirit

  9. The Johannine Teaching

  10. Procession and Personality

  11. The Power of the Spirit After the Glorification of Jesus

  12. The Pentecostal Gifts of Power

(1) Foretold by Jesus
(2) Expected and Prayed for
(3) The Promise Fulfilled
(4) Peter's Interpretation
(5) Immediate Results
(6) Typical Significance
(7) Three Fundamental Truths

  1. Ministrations of the Spirit

(1) Conviction of Sin, Righteousness, and Judgment
(2) Regeneration
(3) Sanctification
(4) Witness and Communion
(5) Revealing the Truth
(6) Imparting Gifts of Power
(7) The Comforter

  1. The Greater Works of the Spirit

(1) Greater than Physical Signs and Wonders.
(2) Jesus' Estimate of Miracles
(3) Lesson from Elijah
(4) Paul's Estimate of External Wonders.

  1. Shows the Real Nature of the Kingdom of God

  2. Personal Presence of the Living God

PART THIRD

OUR FATHER IN HEAVEN

SECTION FIRST
THE UNIVERSAL REVELATION

CHAPTER 1
The Mystery of the Invisible

  1. Witnessed Among All Nations
  2. The Divers Interpretations
  3. Philosophical Theories
  4. Current Theistic Arguments
  5. Words of Zophar and Elihu

CHAPTER 2
Biblical Recognition of the Gods
and Cults of the Nations

  1. Gods of the Nations
  2. Traces of Heathen Myths
  3. Names of the Gods

CHAPTER 3
Origin of the Concept of God

  1. Involved in the Origin of Religion
  2. Inadequate Theories
  3. A Question of Psychology Rather than of History
  4. The Concept a Revelation
  5. Revelation Gradual and in Parts
  6. Childhood of the World

SECTION SECOND
THE HEBREW REVELATION

CHAPTER 1
The Call and Covenant of Abraham

  1. The Migration and the Promise
  2. Meeting with Melchizedek
  3. Defective Ethical Standards
  4. Nomadic Life Favorable to Religious Thought
  5. The Covenant of Promise
  6. Anthropomorphic Conceptions
  7. Other Patriarchal Revelations
  8. The Biblical Narratives Give Truthful Pictures

CHAPTER 2
The Divine Legation of Moses

  1. The Hebrew Exodus
  2. The New Name Jehovah
  3. The Sinaitic Legislation
  4. Comparative Legislation of the Nations

CHAPTER 3
Canaanitish Conflicts and Messages
of the Prophets

  1. Israel's Apostasy from Jehovah
  2. The Concept of Monolatry
  3. Jehovah a Terrible God
  4. Jehovah of Hosts
  5. Human Sacrifices
  6. Ideas of God Enlarged with National Growth
  7. Significance of the Temple
  8. Concept of a Theocratic Kingdom
  9. Apocalyptic Visions of Jehovah
  10. The Biblical Angelology
  11. The Prophetic Monotheism
  12. Theology of the Psalter
  13. Hebrew Ideal of Creation
  14. The Messianic Hope of Israel
  1. A Purposed Goal in Human History

  2. Concept of God as Father

  3. Summary of Old Testament Doctrine

(1) Essential Qualities of Nature
(2) Personality of God
(3) Divine Attributes In Personality
     Omnipotence
     Omniscience
     Omnisentience

SECTION THIRD
THE REVELATION IN JESUS CHRIST

CHAPTER 1
The Threefold Manifestation

  1. Love, Wisdom, and Power in the Person, Mediation, and Kingdom of Christ

  2. Complemental to Old Testament Revelation

  3. Christ the Power of God

  4. Christ the Wisdom of God

  5. Christ the Love of God

CHAPTER 2
Christ's own Testimony and Teaching

  1. Jesus' Testimony in Matthew 11:25-27

(1) Fuller Revelation of the Father
(2) Simplicity of Christ's Gospel Of the Father
(3) The Father's Delight In His Children

  1. Great Advance on the Old Testament View

  2. The Only One Good

  3. Doctrine of Jesus in the Fourth Gospel

(1) God Is Spirit
(2) God Is the Life and the Light
(3) God Is Love
(4) Johatinine Concept of the Fatherhood.

CHAPTER 3
Apostolic Concepts of the Father

  1. In the Epistle of John

  2. In the Other Catholic Epistles

  3. In the Pauline Epistles

(1) Various Striking Phrases
(2) Monotheistic Attributes
(3) sympathy with the Groaning Creation

CHAPTER 4
The Everlasting Fatherhood

  1. Monistic, Immanent, Transcendent

  2. God Conceived as Generator and Generatrix

  3. Providential Oversight and Rule

  4. Suffers with the Groaning Creation

  5. The CryHow Long, O Lord

  6. No Waste of Material or Energy

  7. Defective Concept of Monarchy and Absolutism

  8. The Idea of Divine Maternity

  9. The Everlasting Trinity of Wisdom, Power, and Love

  10. The Everlasting Goal

  • Select Bibliography

  • index of Scripture Texts

  • General Index

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